Televised address from Moscow on the German-Soviet treaty, 12 August 1970

© J.H. Darchinger/Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung

In the Moscow Treaty, the Federal Republic of Germany and the Soviet Union obligate themselves to non-aggression. Moreover, they declare all borders in Europe to be inviolable, especially the western border of Poland. After signing the accord, Federal Chancellor Willy Brandt turns to his fellow countrymen in a televised address from the Soviet capital city. With a view to the former German territories east of the Oder and Neisse rivers, he states: “With this treaty, nothing is lost which had not already been forfeited a long time ago.”
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